Sport Development Blog

 Non-UCL Elbow Injuries
(9/17/2019)
 
 
   

Non-UCL Elbow Injuries


Diamond Doc
By Dr. Marc Richard


Dr. Marc Richard, Orthopedic Surgeon at Duke University and USA Baseball Sport Development Contributor, discusses how to identify, prevent and treat less common, non-UCL elbow injuries in pitches. To have your questions answered by Dr. Richard, submit them using #USABMailbag on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.


Marc Richard, MD, is a contributor to the USA Baseball Sport Development Blog, and is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Duke University, specializing in elbow, wrist and hand injuries. Dr. Richard’s research evaluates the clinical outcomes of fractures of the upper extremity, with a particular interest in wrist and elbow fractures and improving ways to treat elbow arthritis in young patients. He also has a clinical and research interest in adolescent elbow throwing injuries.


 How to Talk About Mental Wellness with Your Athletes
(9/12/2019)
 
 
   

How to Talk About Mental Wellness With Your Athletes


In youth sports


It can be a daunting task, speaking to your athletes about mental wellness. It’s a sensitive topic and one that can’t be tackled lightly. Knowing that, psychiatrist Dave Conant-Norville, MD, shares some valuable tools and tips on how to start the conversation about mental well-being with your athlete, and how to keep those conversations moving forward.

Understand That Mental Wellness Starts Now

“Mental wellness includes all of the processes that go on in your brain — thinking, emotions, behavior, relationship processing. There’s a lot going on. The idea of mental wellness is optimizing, being free of disease. We want to talk about mental wellness in order to help prevent mental illness,” he adds. “We shouldn’t start the conversation after there’s already a problem, we want people to be mentally well.”
 
Start with the Performance Benefits

Some kids are naturally going to be skeptical when it comes to talking to any adult about feelings and emotions, but Conant-Norville suggests leading the conversation with an explanation of mental wellness as performance-enhancing for sport.

“I always say your health is only as good as your mental health, because it’s the governing factor for the rest of your health,” he adds. “It impairs your physical function. An athlete can’t function optimally without mental wellness. It’s really important to get over the dichotomy of the mind and body, that the two are separate.”

Implement Mindfulness 

Deep breathing and meditation are two of Conant-Norville’s favorite practices for athletes, and it’s one of the fastest, simplest ways to get ‘buy in’ from your athletes. Starting and ending practice with a minute or two of silence or even using a short guided meditation can be a great way to introduce the key mindfulness element of mental well-being into your athlete’s life without adding stress of ‘meditation as homework.’ For parents, this can also be a great after-dinner wind-down that the whole family could take part in.

Provide Other Mental Tools

“Successful coaches help students build a vocabulary around things like stress and anxiety. They teach game-day tactics like how to focus and how to relax and mentally prep for a big game,” says Conant-Norville. “For example, if you’re not sleeping adequately, you’re not going to do well,” he adds

Help athletes create a toolkit, whether it be teaching them about the importance of full nights of sleep, practicing deep breathing exercises that an athlete can use before a key practice, or simply making it OK for an athlete to come to you with an emotional issue.

Create a Trusting Community

Creating a sense of trust and fun goes a long way towards encouraging mental wellness. According to Conant-Norville, it also creates a sense of community and encourages open lines of communication. The team that truly enjoys their time together is the team that can share their feelings.

But, don’t just start a conversation with ‘tell me about your emotions,’ says Conant-Norville. That puts most athletes on the defensive, and likely won’t yield authentic results. The same is true for parents: it’s easy to want to demand an emotional conversation but without that sense of trust, it’s unlikely that your athlete will be open with you.
 _____

Part of opening a conversation around mental wellness is paying attention to warning signs and knowing when it’s time to seek professional help for an athlete.

“Coaches are not therapists. You’re not equipped to treat mental health issues,” warns Conant-Norville. If you suspect that an athlete is dealing with some kind of mental health problem, make sure the athlete gets the help he or she needs from an expert

TrueSport®, a movement powered by the experience and values of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, champions the positive values and life lessons learned through youth sport. TrueSport® inspires athletes, coaches, parents, and administrators to change the culture of youth sport through active engagement and thoughtful curriculum based on cornerstone lessons of sportsmanship, character-building, and clean and healthy performance, by creating leaders across communities through sport.


 Visual Training
(9/3/2019)
 
 
   

Visual Training


Diamond Doc
By Dr. Marc Richard


Dr. Marc Richard, Orthopedic Surgeon at Duke University and USA Baseball Sport Development Contributor, the process and benefits of visual training in baseball. To have your questions answered by Dr. Richard, submit them using #USABMailbag on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.


Marc Richard, MD, is a contributor to the USA Baseball Sport Development Blog, and is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Duke University, specializing in elbow, wrist and hand injuries. Dr. Richard’s research evaluates the clinical outcomes of fractures of the upper extremity, with a particular interest in wrist and elbow fractures and improving ways to treat elbow arthritis in young patients. He also has a clinical and research interest in adolescent elbow throwing injuries.


 RBI Single Up the Middle
(9/2/2019)
 
 
   

RBI Single Up the Middle


Monday Manager
By Tom Succow


In this edition of Monday Manager, four-time USA Baseball coaching alum Tom Succow discusses the "we over me" approach to embrace when stepping into the box with two outs and a runner in scoring position. 


Tom Succow, is a contributor to the USA Baseball Sport Development Blog, and is currently the assistant coach at Yavapai College in Prescott, Arizona. In 2017, Succow retired as the Head Baseball Coach at Brophy College Preparatory in Phoenix, Arizona, after 42 years at the helm. Succow accumulated over 700 wins during his tenure, as well as a state championship in 2006 and three state runner-up honors in 1982, 2007 and 2012. Succow is a four-time USA Baseball coaching alum, including an assistant coaching position with the 2003 16U National Team, which won the gold medal in the International Baseball Federation AA World Youth Championships in Taiwan. Succow was honored by the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) as National Coach of the Year in 2007 and is a member of four Halls of Fames, being inducted into the Arizona Baseball Coaches Hall of Fame in 2003, the Brophy Hall of Fame in 2007, the National High School Baseball Coaches Association (BCA) Hall of Fame in 2013, and the Arizona High School Athletic Coaches Hall of Fame in 2016.


 7 Things to Avoid When Raising Good Decision-Makers
(8/29/2019)
 
   

7 Things to Avoid When it Comes to Raising Good Decision-Makers 


In youth sports


Young athletes are faced with a constant barrage of decisions, ranging from when they should take a shot to what sports they ultimately want to play. But logical, careful decision-making isn’t always a skill that comes naturally — it’s often a skill that needs to be nurtured. It can be a challenge for parents and coaches to find a balance between helping athletes develop those decision-making skills through trial and error while also ensuring that athletes find some success along the way.

Dr. Jim Taylor, a sport psychologist and parenting expert, has a unique expertise in helping parents and coaches raise well-rounded athletes who not only excel in sport, but who are able to make rational, well-thought-out decisions from an early age. Here, he talks about the biggest mistakes he sees adults make when it comes to raising a good decision-maker.
 
Not Understanding Your Role 

In early stages of development, when a child’s executive functioning isn’t entirely developed, it can be a challenge for them to make a rational decision. You need to pay attention to your child’s maturity levels (which can ebb and flow over time) and adjust your role in the decision-making process accordingly.

“The role of the parent in decision-making evolves as your child grows,” Taylor says. “It starts as dictator, where you have all the power; then it goes to governor, where you’re giving them some options to choose from; then to consultant, where they consult you for feedback on good decisions; then you become a sounding board, where you’re just listening to them puzzle through decisions. You’re progressively ceding control.”
 
Offering Too Much Choice 

“It’s trendy to focus on ownership and agency, letting kids have a sense of control over their lives,” says Taylor. “But they’ll make millions of decisions throughout their lives, they don’t need to make 50 today. It’s exhausting and confusing.”

It’s okay to moderate some of the decisions your athlete needs to make. Taylor adds, “I use the metaphor of forks in the road. Children are constantly faced with forks in the road: it might be just two, it might be ten choices. We need to help our kids learn to recognize the forks in the road, what the options really are and narrow them down.

Research has shown that the more options you’re faced with, the harder it is to make decisions.”
 
Offering Too Little Choice

On the other side of the spectrum are the parents who don’t offer children any agency, whether it’s choosing their sports for them, laying out clothes to wear, and picking their books to read. Coaches can have the same problem, laying out the game play-by-play and micromanaging athletes until they feel like pawns rather than players.

“Don’t make all of your kid’s decisions,” says Taylor. “Once they become old enough to choose things for themselves, we need to start offering some choices.”
 
Offering Choices That Don’t Exist

“Often, we make an attempt to give a kid a sense of agency where none exists, with the hope that they will make the ‘right’ decision,” says Taylor. “That’s disingenuous. Don’t offer them decisions in areas where you’re not actually going to honor their choices.”
 
Saying a Decision is Wrong or Bad

Raising a good decision-maker doesn’t mean raising a child who always makes the right decision, just one who is capable of being decisive, weighing both sides of an argument, and coming to a firm conclusion. If a child chooses soccer when you think he should play baseball, don’t tell him that was the wrong decision.

“Decision-making is a skill, it comes with experience, but it takes confidence. So when you allow a kid to make a decision, it’s not just about that specific decision. It’s about boosting their ability to make a decision later on,” Taylor adds. “You want them to sometimes make bad decisions because that’s how they’ll learn to make good decisions.”
 
Letting Your Child Avoid Decisions

If you’re the parent or coach of a child who’s obedient to a fault, that may not be an entirely positive thing. “There are some kids who are naturally risk-averse and don’t want to make the wrong decision,” says Taylor. “That fear of failure can be problematic down the road. They start attaching fear to making bad decisions.”

Start pushing the child to make small-scale decisions. Rather than picking your child’s clothes because he or she can’t decide what to wear, Taylor suggests offering two options (the red shirt or the blue shirt). That way, your child is still making a small decision, but it likely won’t be paralyzing.
 
Not Talking About Decision-Making

Making a choice might seem obvious to you as an adult, but kids need to be taught how to make decisions and that doesn’t come naturally. “Talk through decisions, look at how to list the options, and discuss the costs and benefits of each. Talk about which is the right thing to do. Talk about what is in your kid’s best interest,” says Taylor.

Taylor recommends following up on decisions: have the conversation with your athlete a few weeks after a decision to check in on how that choice looks now. “You can’t go back in time to change that decision, but if you have a period of reflection and talk through it, you might not make the same decision again.”
_____

Remember, you’re a role model for your athlete. Decisions are ultimately made based on core values, and to raise an ethical decision-maker means walking the walk.

“Teach kids to be deliberate about decisions,” Taylor says.

“Whatever you value, you’ll make decisions that align with that. If you value winning at all costs, you might take performance-enhancing drugs. If you value sportsmanship, you won’t. And those values may transfer to your kids,” says Taylor. “Instilling healthy, positive values in kids is the foundation for making those good decisions.”

And while it can be maddening waiting for a child to make a decision when you’re trying to tick an item off of your to-do list, remember that you’re not trying to raise someone who can make abrupt decisions. You’re trying to raise a child who can make measured, carefully considered decisions.


TrueSport®, a movement powered by the experience and values of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, champions the positive values and life lessons learned through youth sport. TrueSport® inspires athletes, coaches, parents, and administrators to change the culture of youth sport through active engagement and thoughtful curriculum based on cornerstone lessons of sportsmanship, character-building, and clean and healthy performance, by creating leaders across communities through sport.


 Coaching Philosophy
(8/28/2019)
 
   

Coaching Philosophy


Cuddyer's Corner
By Michael Cuddyer


Former Major Leaguer Michael Cuddyer discusses how what you should emphasize when building your coaching philosophy, and what your purpose should be as the leader of the team. To have your questions answered by Michael Cuddyer, submit them using #USABMailbag on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.


Michael Cuddyer is a contributor to the USA Baseball Sport Development blog, and is a 15-year MLB veteran and two-time All-Star, spending his career playing for the Minnesota Twins, Colorado Rockies and the New York Mets. A member of the USA Baseball 18U National Team in 1996 and 1997, Cuddyer was then named the 1997 Virginia Player of the Year, Gatorade National Player of the Year, and was a member of USA Today’s All-Star team. He was selected ninth overall in the 1997 MLB Amateur Player Draft by the Minnesota Twins.


 Concussions
(8/20/2019)
 
   

Concussions


Diamond Doc
By Dr. Marc Richard


Dr. Marc Richard, Orthopedic Surgeon at Duke University and USA Baseball Sport Development Contributor, discusses how to define, diagnose and treat concussions. To have your questions answered by Dr. Richard, submit them using #USABMailbag on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.


Marc Richard, MD, is a contributor to the USA Baseball Sport Development Blog, and is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Duke University, specializing in elbow, wrist and hand injuries. Dr. Richard’s research evaluates the clinical outcomes of fractures of the upper extremity, with a particular interest in wrist and elbow fractures and improving ways to treat elbow arthritis in young patients. He also has a clinical and research interest in adolescent elbow throwing injuries.


 Rundown Between Third and Home
(8/19/2019)
 
   

Rundown Between Third and Home 


Monday Manager
By Tom Succow


In this edition of Monday Manager, four-time USA Baseball coaching alum Tom Succow discusses both the baserunning and defensive perspective a rundown between third base and home plate, one of the most momentum-swinging and decisive plays in the game .
Tom Succow, is a contributor to the USA Baseball Sport Development Blog, and is currently the assistant coach at Yavapai College in Prescott, Arizona. In 2017, Succow retired as the Head Baseball Coach at Brophy College Preparatory in Phoenix, Arizona, after 42 years at the helm. Succow accumulated over 700 wins during his tenure, as well as a state championship in 2006 and three state runner-up honors in 1982, 2007 and 2012. Succow is a four-time USA Baseball coaching alum, including an assistant coaching position with the 2003 16U National Team, which won the gold medal in the International Baseball Federation AA World Youth Championships in Taiwan. Succow was honored by the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) as National Coach of the Year in 2007 and is a member of four Halls of Fames, being inducted into the Arizona Baseball Coaches Hall of Fame in 2003, the Brophy Hall of Fame in 2007, the National High School Baseball Coaches Association (BCA) Hall of Fame in 2013, and the Arizona High School Athletic Coaches Hall of Fame in 2016.


 Unifying Leadership
(8/16/2019)
 
   

Unifying Leadership


FUNdamental Skills
By Darren Fenster


In the coming weeks and months, teams for all sports and all seasons will begin to take shape.  Experienced upperclassmen will return to college campuses and high school grounds just as wide-eyed newcomers will have no idea what they are in for.  At some schools, veteran players will “welcome” their younger teammates to the club by having them carry equipment bags, pick up garbage, and fill water jugs, along with other forms of initiation, in the name of tradition and paying dues.

Meanwhile, at hopefully many, many more schools, the old will genuinely welcome the new, in the real meaning of the word. 

Back in May, right in the midst of a run to the Stanley Cup Finals, Boston Bruins team captain Zdeno Chara was asked about how his team has blended so well. His answer went viral. 

“No matter if someone is 18 or 40, somebody who has 1,000 games or playing their first game, we treat each other with respect and the same way as everybody else in the locker room. I didn’t like the separation inside of the team between younger players and older players, players who have accomplished something, players who are just coming into the league.  I don’t like to use the word rookie. They are our teammates… Once you’re a team, you’re a team, regardless of the age or accomplishments.”

In a sport with arguably more tradition than all others combined, the captain for one of the NHL’s best teams actively chooses to make his teammates feel, well, like a part of the team.

The best teams in sport aren’t always the most talented, but rather the clubs who collectively work together better than the rest as a cohesive unit, with everyone pulling the rope in the same direction.  Of course, success requires talent. But as history has taught us, success goes beyond talent. Much of this true sense of team is built from a culture whose foundation is set by leaders like Chara with the goal to unify. The toxic sense of selfish individuality that permeates through bad teams is developed in a very similar manner of including… by excluding. 

There is a very simple and incredibly impactful way to create a positive environment amongst old and new: sweep the sheds. 

In the book Legacy, author James Kerr gives an inside look at the All Blacks, New Zealand’s national rugby team who just happens to be one of the most successful sports teams in the history of sports who, at the time of publishing, held a winning percentage of .770. How this club has been able to enjoy so much sustained success is more impressive than their record itself; they attribute their success as much to their culture as they do their talent. 

Part of that culture includes the mantra of sweeping the sheds, where all members of the All Blacks live the tradition that no individual is bigger than the team or those who came before them when it comes to doing their job, both on and off the field. They take as much pride in keeping their locker room clean (sweeping their shed) as they do competing against opposing world powers in rugby.
No one is too good to do something.  When the biggest star or the most experienced veteran are themselves doing the most remedial tasks, like carrying equipment, like picking up trash, like filling water jugs, the newcomers can’t help but notice and will tend to quickly fall in line themselves, just as the All Blacks have done over time.  They are leading by doing the things that no one wants to do, which, ironically, makes everyone else WANT to do them.  This type of leadership bonds and team and its players far better than any words possibly could.

At one point or another, every single player was a rookie. Every single student-athlete was once a freshman. Every single star was the new guy way back when.  For some, it’s an easy transition. For others, it’s an overwhelming one. They ALL want to be a part of the team, sooner rather than later. That team is a simple, conscious decision; an intentional decision made by its leaders, choosing to create that team by unifying one another; new, old, and everyone in between.
Darren Fenster is a contributor to the USA Baseball Sport Development Blog, and is currently the Manager of the Portland Sea Dogs, the Double-A affiliate of the Boston Red Sox. A former player in the Kansas City Royals minor league system, Fenster joined the Red Sox organization in 2012 after filling various roles on the Rutgers University Baseball staff, where he was a two-time All-American for the Scarlet Knights. Fenster is also Founder and CEO of Coaching Your Kids, LLC, and can be found on Twitter @CoachYourKids.


 Strengthening an Athlete's Decision-Making Skills
(8/15/2019)
 
   

Strengthening an Athlete's Decision-Making Skills


In youth sports


Whether it’s making a decision about how to properly prepare for a competition, practice a recovery plan, or stay away from shortcuts, good decision-making, although challenging to teach, is a skill that is critical to an athlete’s success.

According to the Decision Education Foundation (DEF), which seeks to empower youth with effective decision-making skills through curriculum and courses in decision quality, teaching teenagers how to decide is more effective than teaching them what to decide. For example, the popular D.A.R.E. campaign that was implemented in schools nationwide simply told adolescents about the negative effects of drugs and had adolescents sign a pledge to say no to drugs, but it didn’t have a significant effect on actually preventing youth from illicit drug use according to a report by the U.S. General Accounting Office.

Chris Spetzler, DEF Executive Director, recommends helping students understand how to make better decisions as the first step to “increasing their thoughtfulness when engaging their values, creativity, and critical thinking in making and following through on their personal choices.”

As a coach, it’s important to develop an understanding of the decision-making process, as this will better equip you to help shape the way your athletes approach decisions on the field and throughout their lives. DEF explains that there are six elements that must be considered in order to reach a quality decision, including helpful frame, clear values, creative alternatives, useful information, sound reasoning, and commitment to follow through.

Keeping in mind these six foundational elements of a good decision, here are five DEF exercises we’ve tailored for coaches to use at practice with their team to help strengthen an athlete’s decision-making skills:
 
Explain Decisions You’ve Made

Sharing a personal decision-making story of your own can help you build trust with your team, make you more relatable, and allow you to break down the decision-making process with them. Being able to pull from your experience and explain the rationale behind the choices you’ve made will help illustrate the six elements of good decision-making for your team.
 
Case Studies from Sports

Whether it’s deciding who should take the final shot of a game or how to deal the temptation of performance-enhancing drugs, sports come with a lot of decision-making opportunities.
Walking through a sports story that involves decision making is a great way to start the discussion on the topic with your team. Using case studies of athletes who have made poor choices in the past provides your team with the opportunity to dive deep and analyze the situation, reasoning, and outcome of a real decision with real consequences.
 
Interactive Role Play Activities

Inviting your team to participate in simulated decision-making scenarios allows them to critically think and practice the elements of good decisions in real-time.
Have your athletes act out relevant situations, such as deciding how to react to a teammate who consumes energy drinks before practice, to help them evaluate their values and learn how to make more informed decisions.
 
Group Projects

Breaking your athletes into groups and giving them a sport-related challenge to work through is another way you can give them hands-on decision-making experience, while also encouraging them to consider the values and logic of their teammates.
Encourage your groups to share their outcomes and explain how they reached their final decision.
 
Visualization

Many coaches are familiar with the practice of having athletes visualize skills or upcoming games, but you can also apply this technique to your athlete’s decision-making.
For example, practice setting a goal with your athlete and walk through the decisions they would make to reach that goal. Encourage them to visualize their future after achieving their goal and evaluate the steps they needed to take to get there. Would they be proud of the decisions they made to achieve their goal?
_____
Creating a space that encourages the development of an essential life skill like decision-making should be a top priority for the coaches of youth athletes. Continue to encourage your team to evaluate their decisions and take ownership over their actions so they can be proud of the paths they choose.
TrueSport®, a movement powered by the experience and values of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, champions the positive values and life lessons learned through youth sport. TrueSport® inspires athletes, coaches, parents, and administrators to change the culture of youth sport through active engagement and thoughtful curriculum based on cornerstone lessons of sportsmanship, character-building, and clean and healthy performance, by creating leaders across communities through sport.


 El Medio del Cuadro - Ejecutar una Doble Matanza
(8/13/2019)
 
   

El Medio del Cuadro - Ejecutar una Doble Matanza 


USA Baseball


El medio del cuadro puede jugar un papel destacado en el éxito global del equipo. Cuánto más se comunican los jugadores del medio del cuadro, más eficaz será la pareja. Ejecutar las doble matanzas requiere no sólo comunicación eficaz, sino también juego de pies y técnicas correctos. La información que sigue contiene los puntos primarios sobre el posicionamiento, el juego de pies y la alimentación para las doble matanzas tanto para el campo corto como para el defensor de segunda base:

EL POSICIONAMIENTO CORRECTO

En una situación de doble matanza, tanto el campo corto como el defensor de segunda base deben moverse hacia dentro dos o tres pasos y hacia la base entre dos y cuatro pasos. Esto reduce la distancia que se necesita para cubrir la segunda base.

ACERCARSE A LA BASE

Hay varios factores involucrados en ejecutar una doble matanza en la segunda base, y todos son igualmente importantes. Para ejecutar una doble matanza con éxito, el jugador del medio 
del cuadro tiene que acercarse a la base correctamente. Aquí se describe la manera correcta:

 Llega a la base lo más rápido posible, poniendo el pie izquierdo en la base.
 Haz un buen blanco para el tirador con las dos manos extendidas y los dos pulgares juntos, casi a punto de tocarse.
 Dobla las rodillas en una buena posición atlética mientras miras el tirador.
 Relaja las manos, manteniéndolas relajadas para recibir la pelota. No te estires para la pelota; vendrá a ti. Anticipa siempre un tiro malo. No empieces a moverte hasta que el tiro esté en el aire.

EJECUTAR LA DOBLE MATANZA – DEFENSOR DE SEGUNDA BASE

Hay varias maneras de completar la doble matanza en la segunda base. Siguen dos ejemplos generales que se pueden usar para completar una doble matanza:

 Estar de pie a horcajadas sobre la base: Este método se usa primariamente si hay una jugada reñida en la segunda base o si un corredor veloz está de turno. El defensor de segunda base llega a la base y está de pie con la base entre las dos piernas. Mientras atrapa la pelota, rápidamente reajusta los pies en la misma locación y hace el tiro a la primera base. Cuando usa este método, el defensor de segunda base debe estar preparado para saltar por encima del corredor que está deslizándose.
 Sobre la base: Ésta es una manera común de enseñar la doble matanza en la segunda base. Mientras la pelota se golpea, el defensor de segunda base llega rápidamente a la base y pone el pie izquierdo en la base. Mientras viene el tiro de la tercera base o el campo corto, el defensor de segunda base da un paso hacia la pelota con el pie derecho. Si el tiro va al pecho, el defensor de segunda base viene sobre la base. Si el tiro va a su derecho, el defensor de segunda base da un paso hacia la base con el pie derecho y se planta antes de que tire a la primera base. Si el tiro va a su izquierdo, el defensor de segunda base debe dar un paso hacia la pelota y sobre la base con el pie derecho. Este método permite que el defensor evite al corredor que se desliza en la segunda base.

EJECUTAR LA DOBLE MATANZA – CAMPO CORTO

Una vez que la pelota esté en camino, el campo corto empieza a moverse.

El tiro del defensor de segunda base: El campo corto da un paso con el pie derecho sobre la esquina exterior de la base, desobstruye suficiente espacio entre él mismo y el corredor, planta el pie y tira.
 El tiro del defensor de primera base: Si el campo corto recibe el tiro del defensor de primera base dentro de la línea de las bases, el campo coro toca la parte interior de la almohadilla con el pie izquierdo, planta el pie derecho y tira. Si viene de fuera de la línea, arrastra con el pie derecho. Es útil gritar “¡Dentro!” o “¡Fuera!” para comunicar al defensor de primera base a dónde debe tirar la pelota.
 El campo corto lo toma él mismo: Si el campo corto fildea la pelota suficientemente cerca de la segunda base, puede que sea más eficaz ejecutar la doble matanza él mismo. Para hacer esto, simplemente da un paso en la base con el pie izquierdo en el medio del tiro, asegurándose de comunicar al defensor de segunda base su intención de hacer la jugada él mismo. El pie izquierdo del campo corto chocará con la almohadilla justo antes de que suelte la pelota, lo cual es mucho más rápido que pasar el pie derecho sobre la almohadilla y tirar después.
 Evitar al corredor: El campo corto debe desobstruir espacio suficiente ente él mismo y l a almohadilla para que el corredor no pueda chocar con él. Después de tocar la almohadilla con el pie derecho, el campo corto puede moverse lejos de la almohadilla o quedarse cerca, dependiendo de la proximidad del corredor.

LA ALIMENTACIÓN DE DOBLE MATANZA A LA SEGUNDA BASE

Campo corto – Hay varias maneras posibles de tirar a la segunda base:

 Por debajo del hombro: Es importante que este tiro a la segunda base sea firme. El campo corto debe ubicarse detrás del tiro lo suficiente para que la pelota se mueva en una línea al pecho del defensor de segunda base. La clave es marcar el movimiento en el tiro. El campo corto debe usar este tiro sólo cuando está suficientemente cerca de la base o cuando está moviéndose hacia la base para fildear una roleta.
 Por encima del hombro: El tiro debe ser siempre en una línea al pecho del defensor de segunda base. Usa este tiro cuando fildeas una pelota que está demasiado lejos para tirar por debajo del hombro en una línea, o en cualquier pelota que te saca de la segunda base.

Hay dos maneras de hacer este tiro:

1. Ponte de rodillas: Fildea la pelota con el pie izquierdo apuntado ligeramente hacia la almohadilla. Ponte de rodilla derecha y haz el tiro al defensor de segunda base. No te pongas de pie para tirar.
2. Da un paso hacia atrás: Fildea la pelota de manera normal. Da un paso hacia atrás con el pie izquierdo y tira a la segunda base. Esto puede ser un tiro por el lado del brazo.

Segunda Base – Hay tres maneras posibles de tirar a la segunda base.

 Por debajo del hombro – Usa este tiro cuando te mueves hacia la almohadilla o cuando estás cerca de ella. Fildea la pelota y tírala por debajo del hombro a la almohadilla mientras el pie derecho da un paso hacia delante, siguiendo el tiro, con el brazo izquierdo girando hacia arriba detrás de ti. Mantén una muñeca rígida, y no dejes que la pelota gire de los dedos. Tira a la mitad frontal de la almohadilla hacia el pecho del campo corto para que el campo corto pueda venir por la almohadilla.
 Por encima del hombro – Éste es el tiro más difícil para el defensor de segunda base. Asegúrate siempre de un out. Fildea la pelota y rota sobre los tercios anteriores de los pies, poniendo la rodilla izquierda en el suelo y apuntando el torso hacia la segunda base. Tira por encima del hombro al pecho del campo corto, haciéndolo avanzar ligeramente.
 Por el lado del brazo – Esto es un tiro rápido al campo corto que se usa cuando un tiro por debajo del hombro sería demasiado lento o cuando la pelota se fildea en la línea de la base. Fildea la pelota, y con la palma hacia abajo, suelta la pelota al final del movimiento lateral del brazo.

LA JUGADA DE TOQUE

En algunas ocasiones con un corredor en la primera base, puede que se haga el out en la primera base antes de que la pelota se envíe a la segunda base. En dichos casos, el out forzado en la segunda base ya no es necesario, así requiriendo un toque del corredor para conseguir el out.


 PRP Treatment and Causes of UCL Injuries
(8/7/2019)
 
   

PRP Treatment and Causes of UCL Injuries 


Diamond Doc
By Dr. Marc Richard


Dr. Marc Richard, Orthopedic Surgeon at Duke University and USA Baseball Sport Development Contributor, answers a pair of viewer mailbag questions by expanding on the effectiveness of Platelet-rich Plasma Treatment and some common biomechanical causes of UCL injuries. To have your questions answered by Dr. Richard, submit them using #USABMailbag on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.


Marc Richard, MD, is a contributor to the USA Baseball Sport Development Blog, and is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Duke University, specializing in elbow, wrist and hand injuries. Dr. Richard’s research evaluates the clinical outcomes of fractures of the upper extremity, with a particular interest in wrist and elbow fractures and improving ways to treat elbow arthritis in young patients. He also has a clinical and research interest in adolescent elbow throwing injuries.


 Follow Through Swing
(8/7/2019)
 
   

Follow Through Swing 


Tech in Baseball
Presented with Diamond Kinetics


Skill Set: Hitting
Difficulty Level: Easy
Number of Athletes and Coaches: 1-2 athletes and 1 coach, or 2 athletes as partners
Average Time to Complete: 5 minutes
Equipment Required: Bat, tee, baseballs, net or screen to hit into

Goal: Follow through keeping both hands on the bat finishing even with the shoulder

Description of the Drill: 
• Have hitter set up at the plate, or in an open area
• Hitter should swing, focusing on keeping both hands on the bat through the follow through and finishing with the bat even with their shoulders
• Partners switch after 5 swings

Add Difficulty:
• To add a degree of difficulty, hitters can hit a ball off the tee keeping the focus on the follow through

Using Diamond Kinetics SwingTracker Sensor and mobile App - the following metrics and tools can help you measure your swing and see improvement when doing this drill:

Hand Cast Distance
Overview: Hand Cast Distance measure starts when the hitter gets to the load position.  From that point when the bat starts forward acceleration, it measures how far the knob of the bat travels away from that point…measured in inches.  This control metric is important because it shows a hitter’s ability to stay inside the ball instead of swinging around the ball.

Optimal Ranges by Age:
• U10-14 – expect double digit numbers in the teens.
• U15-18 – the batter should try to be a 10 or lower. A good swing

Coaching Insights:
• Hand Cast Distance allows coaches to quantify if a player is staying inside the ball, swinging with his ‘hands back’ and keeping the bat in the best possible position – over the back shoulder – before uncoiling the hands and bat toward the pitched ball.
• Having a large Hand Cast Distance makes it difficult for a batter to hit the fastball, and/or adjust to hitting balls that occupy the middle or inside part of the plate.
• In an ideal swing that results in a minimal amount of hand cast, the hands stay close to the shoulder, with the hands and barrel staying inside the baseball before the barrel gets on plane with the path of the pitch.

Approach Angle  
Overview: Using the Approach Angle metric, hitters clearly know the direction of their swing plane at the moment of impact.  While the optimal Approach Angle is dependent on the type of pitch, it typically needs to be between +5° degrees and +15° degrees in order to hit a line drive and between +20° and +35° degrees in order to hit a home run.

Optimal Ranges by Type of Batter:
• For U10-14 players learning to hit line-drives: +6 to +10
• For U15-18 player who want to hit line-drives: +11 to +19
• For U15-18 power hitters who have strength & ability to hit deep: +20 to +35

Coaching Insights:
• Consider that a pitch is coming “downhill” from the mound at a -6° degree to -8° degree angle. To counter that, a batter should be making contact at an upward angle to “match the plane of the pitch” at a minimum. 
• If you have a kid who is hitting a lot of ground balls – look at the approach angle and work drills to get the point of contact happening at a positive angle. 
• When you marry Approach Angle with Distance in the Zone, you might see why a kid is popping up too much or fouling off. 
• When hitting off a tee or even soft toss, you’d hope to see fairly consistent Approach Angles swing-by-swing, but when doing BP or facing live pitching, you will see a bigger range because the hitter has to “go get” the pitch (and that’s OK). 


Distance in the Zone
Overview: Using the Distance in the Zone metric, hitters can determine when their barrel is entering and leaving the hitting zone.  The longer the barrel stays in the hitting zone, the better chance the player has to make consistent, solid contact.  This is clearly depicted in the 3D viewer as the blue portion of the swing path.

Optimal Ranges by Age:
• U10-14: Good is 29-32 inches
• U15-18: Good is 31-34 inches
• College-Pro: Good is 33-37 inches

Coaching Insights:
• Having a swing that maintains a good Distance in The Zone gives the batter a better chance of making contact with the pitch. It also means the swing is “more forgiving” 
• Having a good Distance In The Zone can account for small errors in timing because there is more “space” for the batter to make contact and still put the ball in play.
• This metric can help coaches identify loopy swings based on how early the barrel enters the zone and if there is a ‘hard-turn’ coming out of the zone.
• Additionally, based on where contact is most often made, it can help identify if a hitter is having issues with timing up the pitch.

For more Tech in Baseball videos, click here.


Diamond Kinetics is the market leader in mobile motion technology and information that enables player development, superior equipment fitting, objective scouting and recruiting, and engagement-driven entertainment.


 RBI Double to the Wall
(8/5/2019)
 
   

RBI Double to the Wall


Monday Manager
By Tom Succow


In this edition of Monday Manager, four-time USA Baseball coaching alum Tom Succow discusses all the ingredients necessary for a hitter to put their team on the board and clear the bases with a deep, RBI Double to the outfield wall.

Tom Succow, is a contributor to the USA Baseball Sport Development Blog, and is currently the assistant coach at Yavapai College in Prescott, Arizona. In 2017, Succow retired as the Head Baseball Coach at Brophy College Preparatory in Phoenix, Arizona, after 42 years at the helm. Succow accumulated over 700 wins during his tenure, as well as a state championship in 2006 and three state runner-up honors in 1982, 2007 and 2012. Succow is a four-time USA Baseball coaching alum, including an assistant coaching position with the 2003 16U National Team, which won the gold medal in the International Baseball Federation AA World Youth Championships in Taiwan. Succow was honored by the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) as National Coach of the Year in 2007 and is a member of four Halls of Fames, being inducted into the Arizona Baseball Coaches Hall of Fame in 2003, the Brophy Hall of Fame in 2007, the National High School Baseball Coaches Association (BCA) Hall of Fame in 2013, and the Arizona High School Athletic Coaches Hall of Fame in 2016.


 El Juego Libre
(8/2/2019)
 
   

El Juego Libre 


USA Baseball 

El juego libre, o el juego deliberado, supone las actividades de desarrollo físico que son intrínsecamente motivadoras, que proveen gratificación inmediata y que son diseñadas específicamente para maximizar el placer. Las actividades del juego deliberado ocurren típicamente entre los 6 y los 14 años e incluyen juegos clásicos del vecindario como el béisbol de jardín trasero y el basquetbol de calle.  Estos juegos normalmente consisten en equipos pequeños con reglas flexibles y definidos por los pares.

¿Por qué promover el juego libre?

El juego libre ofrece muchos beneficios. Estos beneficios incluyen:

 Facilitar una pasión y un amor por el juego a través de la exploración del juego.
 Permitir una motivación intrínseca para el éxito.
 Promover el desarrollo como atleta entero.
 Estimular el desarrollo del cerebro a través de aumentar la resolución creativa de problemas, los procesos de pensamiento, la adaptación y la resolución de conflictos.
 Fomentar el desarrollo social a través de la creación de reglas y del trabajo en equipo.
 Aumentar la autonomía, la motivación y el placer.

¿Cómo pueden promover los entrenadores el juego libre?

Los entrenadores desempeñan un papel importante en la promoción del juego libre.

 Permitir que los jugadores resuelvan sus propios problemas y trabajen juntos en equipo para resolver los conflictos.
 Dar a los jugadores acceso al equipo, y permitir que los jugadores determinen cuál juego van a jugar.
 Dedicar cierta parte del entrenamiento para que los jugadores puedan participar en el juego libre.
 Animar a los jugadores a participar en el juego libre en casa.
 Permitir que los jugadores participen en actividades de juego libre antes de los partidos.

¿Cuándo debe ocurrir el juego libre?

El juego libre puede ocurrir en cualquier momento, sea en los entrenamientos, antes de los partidos o en casa. Los entrenadores pueden planear para que los jugadores participen en el juego libre antes de, durante o después de los entrenamientos como parte del plan completo de entrenamiento. Antes de los partidos, los entrenadores pueden animar a los jugadores a empezar el calentamiento con el juego libre, o pueden permitir que los jugadores se mantengan relajados antes del partido a través de participar en actividades de juego libre. Los  jugadores pueden participar en el juego libre en cualquier momento cuando están en casa.

Recomendación de USA Baseball

USA Baseball recomienda que se permita que los jugadores participen en actividades de juego libre durante los últimos 10 minutos del entrenamiento para promover el placer y el aprendizaje del juego.

Ejemplos de actividades de juego libre
 El béisbol de jardín trasero
 Pepper
 Wall Ball
 Stick Ball
 Sock Ball
 Pickle
 Wiffle Ball
 Vitilla
 Kickball


 Knee to Knee Tee
(8/1/2019)
 
   

Knee to Knee Tee


Tech in Baseball
Presented with Diamond Kinetics


Skill Set: Hitting
Difficulty Level: Easy
Number of Athletes and Coaches: 1-2 athletes and 1 coach, or 2 athletes as partners
Average Time to Complete: 5 minutes
Equipment Required: Bat, tee, baseballs, net or screen to hit into

Goal: Focus on keeping the front leg firm throughout the finish of the swing

Description of the Drill: 
• Tee set up in front of the middle of the plate
• Hitter sets up even with the plate, while partner places a ball on the tee
• Hitter starts with 75% swings
• After hitter makes contact, the back kneecap should move toward the inside of the front knee, touching it, and lifting the back foot off of the ground
• The focus should be on keeping the front leg firm throughout the finish of the swing
• Once the hitter feels comfortable with this movement, they can perform 100% swings with the knee to knee movement
• Partners switch after 10 swings

Add Difficulty:
• To add a degree of difficulty, the hitter can also move the tee to different contact point heights (low, middle, high)

Using Diamond Kinetics SwingTracker Sensor and mobile App - the following metrics and tools can help you measure your swing and see improvement when doing this drill:

Approach Angle
Overview: Using the Approach Angle metric, hitters clearly know the direction of their swing plane at the moment of impact.  While the optimal Approach Angle is dependent on the type of pitch, it typically needs to be between +5° degrees and +15° degrees in order to hit a line drive and between +20° and +35° degrees in order to hit a home run.

Optimal Ranges by type of batter:
• For U10-14 players learning to hit line-drives: +6 to +10
• For U15-18 player who want to hit line-drives: +11 to +19
• For U15-18 power hitters who have strength & ability to hit deep: +20 to +35


Coaching Insights:
• Consider that a pitch is coming “downhill” from the mound at a -6° degree to -8° degree angle. To counter that, a batter should be making contact at an upward angle to “match the plane of the pitch” at a minimum. 
• If you have a kid who is hitting a lot of ground balls – look at the approach angle and work drills to get the point of contact happening at a positive angle. 
• When you marry Approach Angle with Distance in the Zone, you might see why a kid is popping up too much or fouling off. 
• When hitting off a tee or even soft toss, you’d hope to see fairly consistent Approach Angles swing-by-swing, but when doing BP or facing live pitching, you will see a bigger range because the hitter has to “go get” the pitch (and that’s OK). 

Distance in the Zone
Overview: Using the Distance in the Zone metric, hitters can determine when their barrel is entering and leaving the hitting zone.  The longer the barrel stays in the hitting zone, the better chance the player has to make consistent, solid contact.  This is clearly depicted in the 3D viewer as the blue portion of the swing path.

Optimal Ranges by Age:
• U10-14: Good is 29-32 inches
• U15-18: Good is 31-34 inches
• College-Pro: Good is 33-37 inches

Coaching Insights:
• Having a swing that maintains a good Distance in The Zone gives the batter a better chance of making contact with the pitch. It also means the swing is “more forgiving” 
• Having a good Distance In The Zone can account for small errors in timing because there is more “space” for the batter to make contact and still put the ball in play.
• This metric can help coaches identify loopy swings based on how early the barrel enters the zone and if there is a ‘hard-turn’ coming out of the zone.
• Additionally, based on where contact is most often made, it can help identify if a hitter is having issues with timing up the pitch.

Max Barrel Speed
Overview: Using Barrel speed, hitters can know the maximum speed of the bat’s barrel during their swing.  It’s measured in miles per hour, so it’s easy to understand and measure improvement over time.  Higher barrel speed is the main factor in producing high exit velocity after contact so the ball goes further… faster.

Top 10% of Age Groups:
• U10 Players: 49mph +
• U12 Players: 54mph +
• U14 Players: 58mph +
• U16 Players: 63mph +
• U18 Players: 69mph +
• D1 College:   72mph +

Coaching Insights:
• This is the maximum speed of the bat’s barrel during a swing, at a point 20% from the tip of the bat (i.e. the sweet spot). It is the main factor in producing high exit velocity when the ball is hit. It greatly affects both the distance and speed at which the ball travels after impact. 
• Keep in mind that hitters need to “square the ball up” to maximize ball exit velocity.
• Increasing barrel speed is an important goal. Improvement should be measured over time to see if there is real physical and/or swing-mechanic growth. 
• Mechanics are important, but so is size & strength. So when thinking about a kid’s projectability, keep in mind if a player is not done growing yet.

For more Tech in Baseball videos, click here.


Diamond Kinetics is the market leader in mobile motion technology and information that enables player development, superior equipment fitting, objective scouting and recruiting, and engagement-driven entertainment.


 Blending the Old With the New
(7/19/2019)
 
   

Blending the Old With The New


FUNdamental Skills
By Darren Fenster


The baseball industry is in a very interesting place right now. The lens through which players, coaches, and fans now see the game has probably changed more in the last five years than it had in the previous 50. 

In 2015, Major League Baseball integrated Statcast in all 30 if its ballparks, opening up a completely new way to analytically think about the game through this state-of-the art tracking system that collected baseball data was never previously recorded, let alone even thought about. As such, launch angle, exit velocity, and route efficiency were born.  And thanks to a few other devices, spin rate, pitch axis, and attack angle came to life soon thereafter.

These technologies have significantly changed the way many coaches coach, many players train, and in turn, the way many teams play.  Pitchers are throwing harder than ever, where the offensive approach of working counts to get into a team’s bullpen is a thing of the past. Hitters are elevating the ball at a rate that we’ve never seen before, while swinging and missing at a frequency that would drive a little league coach nuts. 

Some argue that Statcast has had a negative impact on the game with a focus on these new metrics rather than the game itself, but that view is short-sighted. For years, coaches have used radar guns and stopwatches as a means to evaluate players. Measurables are not new by any means; there are just far more of them now thanks to the technologies that have developed in recent years.  

Old school coaches often lament at the new technology and those who extensively employ it, sarcastically questioning how players ever managed to get better without every single part of a hitter’s swing or pitcher’s delivery being tracked like it is now. The new school regime of coaches often mock the time-tested coaches and their approach to development by discounting anything that has been done forever, foolishly asserting that the game has passed those others by.

There has never been a bigger disconnect within the game between the old and the new than there is now. But, just like with everything else in life, there needs to be balance.  Discarding something that is productive just because it is “old school” is just as naïve as implementing something new solely because it’s new. Experience can be one of the game’s best teachers. And today’s technologies and analytics can make that experience that much more valuable.

Two years ago at the ABCA National Convention in Dallas, Astros’ manager A.J. Hinch took to the stage and told the group of more than 6,000 baseball coaches in attendance, “if you still coach the same way you did five years ago, someone in your league has passed you by.” But that doesn’t mean you throw away everything you knew and everything you did a short time ago. It simply means you grow and continue to learn the game in an effort to get better.  That growth isn’t new school, and it isn’t old school. It’s the best of both schools. 


Darren Fenster is a contributor to the USA Baseball Sport Development Blog, and is currently the Manager of the Portland Sea Dogs, the Double-A affiliate of the Boston Red Sox. A former player in the Kansas City Royals minor league system, Fenster joined the Red Sox organization in 2012 after filling various roles on the Rutgers University Baseball staff, where he was a two-time All-American for the Scarlet Knights. Fenster is also Founder and CEO of Coaching Your Kids, LLC, and can be found on Twitter @CoachYourKids.


 Baseball Myths
(7/17/2019)
 
   

Baseball Myths


Cuddyer's Corner
By Michael Cuddyer


Former Major Leaguer Michael Cuddyer draws upon his wealth of baseball experience to dispel a number of common baseball myths. To have your questions answered by Michael Cuddyer, submit them using #USABMailbag on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.


Michael Cuddyer is a contributor to the USA Baseball Sport Development blog, and is a 15-year MLB veteran and two-time All-Star, spending his career playing for the Minnesota Twins, Colorado Rockies and the New York Mets. A member of the USA Baseball 18U National Team in 1996 and 1997, Cuddyer was then named the 1997 Virginia Player of the Year, Gatorade National Player of the Year, and was a member of USA Today’s All-Star team. He was selected ninth overall in the 1997 MLB Amateur Player Draft by the Minnesota Twins.


 Los Beneficios de Hacer Múltiples Deportes
(7/30/2018)
 
   

Los Beneficios de Hacer Múltiples Deportes


USA Baseball

¿POR QUÉ ENTRENAMOS? ¡ESTAMOS TRATANDO DE INFLUIR EN LAS VIDAS DE NUESTROS JUGADORES!

El fin de la temporada de béisbol puede ser triste para todo el mundo. La transición al tiempo más fresco y el cambio de estaciones hasta el otoño pueden ser difíciles para alguien que disfruta de pasar la primavera y el verano en el campo de béisbol. Aunque estos cambios signifiquen el fin de la temporada de béisbol, ¡no tienen que significar el fin de participar en los deportes a lo largo del año!
Hay muchos beneficios de participar en múltiples deportes a lo largo del año.

Evitar el Agotamiento


Hacer el mismo deporte todos los días durante un periodo de tiempo prolongado, como a lo largo del año, puede llevar rápidamente al agotamiento. Agotamiento en un deporte significa cuando un atleta se fatiga mentalmente a causa de hacer un deporte demasiado a menudo. Cuando los atletas hacen un deporte demasiado a menudo a una edad temprana, puede que el atleta pierda el aspecto de diversión en el deporte. Entonces, el atleta querrá dejar de hacer deporte porque está harto de ello, y simplemente ya no es divertido. El deporte se convierte en trabajo, y al atleta le molesta ir a los partidos y los entrenamientos. Jugar en las ligas muy competitivas durante todo el año puede ejercer presión en atletas jóvenes, lo cual les causa volverse resentidos.
Es importante recordar que los niños hacen deportes porque pueden divertirse con amigos, disfrutan de hacer y les gusta competir. Estas tres cosas son las claves de la participación en los deportes juveniles. Demasiados atletas jóvenes se agotan porque el foco en estas claves simples se pierde cuando el atleta hace un deporte durante un periodo de tiempo prolongado. En tomar un descanso de un deporte para hacer otro, los atletas reciben más variedad, además de varias situaciones, y pueden continuar con los deportes porque es más probable que les gusten.

Reducir el Riesgo de las Lesiones Relacionadas con el Uso Excesivo


Las lesiones de uso excesivo y el agotamiento van juntos. Si atletas hacen un deporte a lo largo del año, usan constantemente los huesos y los músculos en edad de crecimiento de la misma manera. Sin variedad en el movimiento y el uso muscular, los músculos y los huesos que se usan a menudo pueden empezar a agotarse por el uso excesivo. La moción repetitiva del mismo deporte a lo largo del año, al hacer los mismos ejercicios, lleva a menudo a las lesiones de uso excesivo, como las fracturas por estrés, las torceduras y los esguinces, e incluso los desgarros en los músculos, los tendones y los ligamentos.
Al hacer una variedad de deportes,  especialmente durante los años de desarrollo, es probable que mejore el rendimiento de los atletas en otros deportes.

Desarrollar Mejores Habilidades Como Atleta Completo

En cuántas más deportes y actividades se involucran los niños a una edad temprana, más oportunidades tienen de desarrollarse como atleta, no sólo como jugador de béisbol, fútbol, basquetbol o fútbol americano. Muchas habilidades y técnicas se transfieren de un deporte a otro y se complementan mientras siguen desarrollar y fortalecer las habilidades preexistentes. Cuando los atletas desarrollan las habilidades tras varios deportes y actividades, es probable que su rendimiento en otros deportes mejore.
Por ejemplo, tanto el béisbol como el fútbol suponen el correr. En el béisbol, se corre alrededor de las bases y para perseguir las pelotas que se han bateado. En el fútbol, se corre por el campo, pasando el balón y tratando de anotar. Mientras que el correr de béisbol usualmente es más explosivo, en distancias cortas durante periodos cortos de tiempo, el correr de fútbol supone más resistencia, en distancias largas durante periodos largos de tiempo. Si un atleta hace tanto el béisbol como el fútbol, desarrollará las habilidades tanto del correr explosivo como del correr de resistencia. La habilidad del correr de resistencia les puede ayudar en el béisbol si batean un triple, y la habilidad del correr explosivo les puede ayudar en el fútbol si tratan de robar el balón del oponente. La combinación de las dos habilidades produce un atleta más completo.

Oportunidades de Desarrollar Más Habilidades Mentales para la Vida

Hacer múltiples deportes puede ayudar a los niños a desarrollar habilidades importantes para la vida, como la resolución de los problemas, el trabajo en equipo, la comunicación y la responsabilidad. Mientras que hacer un deporte imparte lecciones valiosas, hacer una variedad de deportes permite que las lecciones se enseñen y se aprendan en diferentes ambientes, lo cual ayuda a enseñar la adaptabilidad y la actitud receptiva hacia el cambio. Hacer múltiples deportes provee gran oportunidad de exponerse a nuevos papeles en equipo y hacerse jugador completo. Por ejemplo, un jugador que es el mejor en el campo de béisbol puede beneficiar de jugar otro papel en el basquetbol.

Habilidad de Seguir Fomentar la Confianza

El deporte es un gran vehículo de fomentar la autoestima en los jóvenes. En cada deporte, hay varios niveles de éxito que un joven puede lograr. Ya sea realizar un tiro libre o batear un sencillo, cada paso del proceso en el deporte ofrece una nueva oportunidad de lograr éxito. Mientras los atletas logran éxito en los deportes, su autoestima aumenta porque empiezan a entender que pueden derrotar cualquier obstáculo, tanto en el deporte como en la vida.


 Las Furgonetas de Pasajeros
(7/26/2019)
 
   

Las Furgonetas de Pasajeros 


USA Baseball 

El uso de furgonetas de 15 pasajeros para transportar a participantes atléticos ha sido objeto de escrutinio debido a los riesgos documentados de volcar y la responsabilidad catastrófica asociada potencial que puede resultar de heridas graves o muerte de múltiples pasajeros.
La Junta Nacional de Seguridad en el Transporte examinó los datos de colisiones de un solo vehículo de siete estados en los años 1994 a 1997 y publicó múltiples informes y avisos, con el más reciente en 2012. El aviso más reciente ha sido moderado de avisos previos pero persisten preocupaciones aunque los productores publicitan las mejoras recientes de los modelos más nuevos. Los avisos parecen tener un impacto positivo ya que la cantidad de muertes de las colisiones de furgonetas de 15 pasajeros ha disminuido considerablemente.

LO QUE SIGUE ES UN RESUMEN DEL AVISO MÁS RECIENTE DE LA JUNTA NACIONAL DE SEGURIDAD EN TRANSPORTE PUBLICADO EN 2012:

Las furgonetas de 15 pasajeros nunca se deben sobrecargar con pasajeros ni carga, ya que esto puede subir el riesgo de volcar y hacer la furgoneta menos estable en cualquier maniobra.
• Todos los conductores deben licenciarse adecuadamente y ser experimentados en la conducción de furgonetas de 15 pasajeros.
• Todos los pasajeros deben llevar cinturones de seguridad. La mayoría de las muertes han ocurrido con pasajeros que no se habían abrochado el cinturón y se tiraron de la furgoneta.
• Se debe mantener la furgoneta regularmente.
• Los componentes de dirección y suspensión deben inspeccionarse según las directrices del productor.
• Los neumáticos deben ser de tamaño correcto y tener la capacidad de carga correcta. Ve el manual de propietario y el montante de la puerta para más información.
• Se deben inspeccionar los neumáticos antes de cada viaje para la inflación correcta y señales de deterioro por uso. Ve el manual de propietario y el montante de la puerta para información sobre la inflación correcta.
• Los neumáticos de repuesto no se deben usar como sustitución y muchos productores recomienden que neumáticos que tienen más de 10 años no se usen.
LO QUE SIGUE ES UN RESUMEN DE LOS AVISOS PREVIOS DE LA JUNTA NACIONAL DE SEGURIDAD EN TRANSPORTE Y OTRAS FUENTES DE MINIMIZACIÓN DE RIESGOS

• Cuando una furgoneta se carga con 10 ocupantes o más, es tres veces más probable que vuelque, comparado con menos de 10 ocupantes.
• La propensión a volcar se incrementa considerablemente a una velocidad de más de 50 mph y en calles curvas.
• El diseño estándar de la furgoneta de 15 pasajeros no cumple con los requisitos de refuerzo estructural de automóviles de pasajeros o transportes escolares en el área detrás del asiento de conductor.
• Muchas leyes estatales prohíben el uso de furgonetas de 15 pasajeros para transportar a estudiantes de preparatoria hacia y desde eventos escolares. Ve la carta para el estado de las leyes estatales.
• Investigación adicional indica que los furgonetas de 12 pasajeros no salen mucho mejor y que algunos VUD presentan riesgos significativos de volcar.
• www.safecar.gov ofrece información adicional sobre la seguridad de furgonetas.

EN RESPUESTA A LAS PREOCUPACIONES YA MENCIONADAS, SE RECOMIENDA QUE LAS ORGANIZACIONES DEPORTIVAS QUE TRANSPORTAN A JÓVENES DE PREPARATORIA Y NIÑOS MÁS PEQUEÑOS ADOPTEN LAS SIGUIENTES REGULACIONES

1. Requerir siempre que los padres transporten a sus hijos cuando sea posible.
2. Para las organizaciones deportivas que alquilan o piden prestados sus vehículos, las furgonetas de 15 y 12 pasajeros no se deben usar nunca. Mejores vehículos de sustitución incluyen camionetas de siete pasajeros, carros de pasajeros o transportes escolares con propensión mucho más bajo con cargas más grandes.
3. Para las organizaciones que poseen furgonetas de 15 o 12 pasajeros, dichas furgonetas deben reemplazarse con alternativas más seguras como camionetas o transportes escolares lo más antes posible.

SI UNA ORGANIZACIÓN DEPORTIVA VA A USAR UNA FURNOGETA DE 15 O 12 PASAJEROS PARA TRANSPORTAR A PARTICIPANTES, A PESAR DE LOS AVISOS, SE DEBEN TOMAR LAS SIGUIENTES PRECAUCIONES

1. Siempre usar un conductor entrenador y experimentado que no es estudiante. Aunque el conductor de un furgoneta de 15 o 12 pasajeros no tiene que tener licencia comercial de conducir, dicho conductor debe entender y familiarizarse con manejar una furgoneta completamente cargada. El conductor debe estar bien descansado y atento, y no bajo los efectos de drogas. Además, sería mejor si alguien aparte del entrenador sea el conductor, ya que puede que el entrenador esté exhausto o preocupado por el resultado del partido o por problemas de rendimiento del equipo. Se debe hacer un registro de vehículo de motor para todos los conductores para asegurar que no tengan más de dos violaciones menores en los últimos tres años ni delitos graves como una conducción bajo la influencia de alcohol o la conducción temeraria, en los últimos cinco años.
2.Los conductores deben estar consciente de las siguientes condiciones que a menudo resultan en el derrumbe del vehículo:
1. La furgoneta sale de una calle rural y aterriza en una zanja, choca con un terraplén o se atasca en tierra blanda. 
2. El conductor está fatigado, se queda dormido al volante o conduce demasiado rápido para las condiciones. Las furgonetas que se conducen a altas velocidades en que el conductor pierde control muchas veces salen de la calle. 
3. El conductor sobrecorrige la conducción como reacción de pánico a una emergencia o a una rueda que sale del pavimento. Insiste que todos los ocupantes lleven cinturones de seguridad durante la duración completa del viaje. Setenta y seis porciento de los que murieron en furgonetas de 15 pasajeros en colisiones de un solo vehículo entre 1990 y 2002 no se habían abrochado el cinturón de seguridad. Un ocupante libre de ataduras en un furgoneta de 15 pasajeros en una colisión de un solo vehículo es aproximadamente tres veces más propenso a morir que un ocupante refrenado. 
4. Si es posible, mueve a los pasajeros y la carga delante del eje de atrás. Evita poner carga en el techo. 
5. Chequea los neumáticos antes de cada viaje para verificar que estén inflados adecuadamente y que no estén excesivamente deteriorados. La presión de cada neumático debe chequearse cuando está “frío” y ajustarla a la presión recomendada de inflación especificada en el manual de propietario. Puede que sea sorprendente para muchos que la presión recomendada típica de los neumáticos traseros puede ser mucho más alta que la de los delanteros. Las furgonetas siempre deben equiparse con manómetro. 

PREOCUPACIONES ADICIONALES

Bajo la mayoría de leyes estatales, la organización deportiva se puede demandar además del propietario y el conductor del vehículo si hay un accidente de tránsito que resulta en lesiones. Muchas compañías de seguros que proveen el seguro de responsabilidad de automóviles no poseídos o contratados para las organizaciones deportivas excluyen la cobertura de demandas que surgen a partir del uso de furgonetas de 15 pasajeros o del transporte de participantes. Hay que estar consciente de si su póliza contenga estas exclusiones o no.Algunas organizaciones deportivas transfieren el riesgo de transporte en grupo a través de contratar un servicio de autobús. Se debe pedir siempre del servicio un certificado de seguro que indica que tiene una póliza con un límite de responsabilidad de $1,000,000 como mínimo para todos autos poseídos.Por cortesía de John M. Sadler, JD, CIC; miembro del comité consultivo de medicina y seguridad de USA Baseball; Presidente Sadler Sports & Recreation Insurance